Movement patterns and activity of desert-adapted lions in Namibia - March 2009

Introduction
Results
> Sampling
> Activity Patterns
> Distances
> Home Ranges

Understanding the spatial and temporal patterns of movements and how lions utilise their home ranges have not been previous been possible in this study. The data from GPS radio collars, however, provided new insights. Figure 6 displays a map of the areas occupied by the radio-collared lions. Calculating the size of home ranges is difficult. There are many different methods, and depending on the movement patterns of an animal, some are more suitable than others. In this analysis the home range size of lions marked with GPS radio collars were calculated using the Minimum Convex Polygon (MCP) and the Kernel contour techniques (Table 2). The home ranges of males were on average larger than those of females for both the MCP and Kernel methods.

Figure 6. Layout of the areas utilised by lions fitted with GPS radio collars in the northern Namib.  
Table 2. Home range estimates (km sqr), using Minimum Convex Polygon (MCP) and Kernel contour techniques, of eight lions fitted with GPS radio collars in the northern Namib (blue = males, orange = females).

Figures 7 – 14 presents maps displaying the MCP and Kernel contours of the home ranges of each of the marked lions.

Figure 7. The home range area of Xpl-3 (male).
Figure 8. The home range area of Xpl-16 (male)
Figure 9. The home range area of Xpl-35 (male).

Figure 10. The home range area of Xpl-44 (male).
Figure 11. The home range area of Xpl-17 (female).
Figure 12. The home range area of Xpl-18 (female).
Figure 13. The home range area of Xpl-25 (female).
Figure 14. The home range area of Xpl-47 (female).

> Movement Patterns
>>>Time Frequencies
>>>Spider Analysis
>>>Circular Statistics
>>>Quarter Degree Squares