Movement patterns and activity of desert-adapted lions in Namibia - March 2009

Introduction
Results
> Sampling
> Activity Patterns
> Distances
> Home Ranges
> Movement Patterns
>>>Time Frequencies
>>>Spider Analysis
>>>Circular Statistics
>>>Quarter Degree Squares

The distances that lions moved away from the CP of their respective home ranges were grouped into four quarters, based on the bearing (Figure 33).

 

Figure 33. Bearing from CP of home range as grouped into four quarters: North-East (0-90 deg), South-East (91-180 deg), South-West (181-270 deg), North-West (270-360 deg).

The average distances that the six lions moved from the CP varied according to the direction (Figures 34 – 39). These findings contribute to the statistical process of evaluating and demonstrating the heterogeneous movement patterns. When the results from the “Spider Analysis”, “Circular Statistics”, Kernel home range estimates, and daily distances from the CP, are combined, an understanding of the movements of lions emerge, that have not previously been possible for this study.

Figure 34. Average distance (SD) from CP of home range, for Xpl-3 (male). Figure 35. Average distance (SD) from CP of home range, for Xpl-16 (male).
Figure 36. Average distance (SD) from CP of home range, for Xpl-44 (male). Figure 37. Average distance (SD) from CP of home range, for Xpl-17 (female).
Figure 38. Average distance (SD) from CP of home range, for Xpl-18 (female). Figure 39. Average distance (SD) from CP of home range, for Xpl-47 (female).

These results are particularly valuable for the process of developing lion eco-tourism in the region. A sound understanding of the movement patterns will serve to increase the probability and likelihood of tour operators finding and viewing lions. In addition, this information will also aid the management and prevention of conflicts between lions and people over livestock.